Thursday, June 30

WGA News: Madelyn 'Moochie' Taylor Inducted Into Caddie Hall of Fame

"Moochie is a trailblazer and embodies the gold standard of hard work and professionalism. From personifying the values she learned as a caddie to showing young women everywhere how far the game of golf can take you in life -- and now as the first female African American inducted into the Caddie Hall of Fame -- she is a true inspiration to us all."
Jeff Harrison, WGA senior vice president

WASHINGTON, DC – Madelyn "Moochie" Turner was inducted into the Caddie Hall of Fame on Monday, June 27, in recognition of her outstanding contributions to the game of golf and society through caddying -- and using caddying as a steppingstone to professional success.

Moochie Turner (center), flanked by young caddies.
She is the first female African American to be inducted into the Caddie Hall of Fame (CHOF), which 
highlights the tradition and importance of caddying by celebrating individuals who have devoted their lives to the game of golf through caddying or by supporting the role of caddies, and those who have used their experience as a youth caddie for future professional success.

Past CHOF inductees include Jim Dent, Charles "Chick" Evans, Joe LaCava, Carl Jackson, Jack Nicklaus, Frances Ouimet, Charles Schwab, Peter Ueberroth, Tom Watson and Steve Williams.

Established in 1999 by the Professional Caddies Association, the Caddie Hall of Fame has been administered by the Western Golf Association since 2011. Turner was inducted during a reception at the Renee Powell Clearview Legacy Benefit at East Potomac Golf Course in Washington, D.C. The event included an LPGA pro meet and greet, presentations from the Mayor's Office and National Links Trust, as well as a diversity in golf panel. WGA leaders were on site at the event to present Turner her CHOF plaque.

A Lifetime in Golf

Since she was 7 years old, Moochie Turner has been involved in golf. She notably caddied as a youth for her mother, Vernice Turner, during the late 1950s and early 1960s, because it was difficult to find anyone who would carry a bag for a Black female golfer.

Together, they won numerous United Golfers Association (UGA) Championships around the country with Turner on the bag. They were inducted into the National Black Golf Hall of Fame in 2021 as the only mother-daughter duo to win a UGA Championship in the same year -- Turner won the girls' junior division, then later in the week caddied for her mother, who won the women's division.

Turner caddied for her mother until she went to college, then went on to have a distinguished 34-year career in the FBI as a physical instructor teaching self-defense tactics. Now retired, she spends her summers in East Canton, Ohio, at the historic Clearview Golf Club, helping give instruction to youth, women and veterans.

"Caddying was one of my greatest experiences.
I learned about honesty, sportsmanship, loyalty
and how to play the game.
I hope more females start to caddie
because of all the opportunities it offers."
Moochie Turner

In a letter nominating her friend Moochie for induction into the Caddie Hall of Fame, Renee Powell wrote: "Certainly, her induction will serve as a beacon of light for those who maybe did not realize that golf is for everyone and how being introduced to it through caddying can open many doors."

A special presentation also was made as part of the induction, with WGA leaders introducing Moochie Turner to four young female caddies who are working at Langston Golf Course this summer. The WGA and National Links Trust are overseeing a youth caddie program for underserved students who hope to one day earn a college scholarship.

"These young women will be able to follow in Moochie's footsteps and learn the game of golf through caddying," WGA senior vice president Jeff Harrison said. "This is the future of the game -- and it wouldn't have been possible without the path that Moochie created."

Tuesday, June 21

VIDEO: Conor Moore Takes Comedic Aim at LIV Golf and Its New Players

Monday, June 20

U.S. Open Champion Matt Fitzpatrick: 'The Feeling's Out of This World'

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If you watched on Sunday, then you probably agree that it was a great finish to the U.S. Open at The Country Club. Three young players battled down the stretch -- only one of them a major winner -- all hitting terrific shots under U.S. Open pressure and all having a chance to the end. Following is a portion of the USGA recap of the final round, provided to media via email.

MATT FITZPATRICK IS A CHAMPION once again at The Country Club.

The 27-year-old Englishman who triumphed nine years ago at this iconic venue when he claimed the U.S. Amateur, became just the 13th man and the first non-American to also add the U.S. Open Championship to his portfolio.

In winning the 122nd edition of the championship on a chilly New England Sunday by one stroke over past U.S. Junior Amateur champions Will Zalatoris and Scottie Scheffler, Fitzpatrick joined World Golf Hall of Famer and 18-time major champion Jack Nicklaus as the only golfers to have won the USGA's two oldest championships at the same venue. Nicklaus accomplished his feat at Pebble Beach Golf Links in 1961 and 1972.

Now 50 years later, Fitzpatrick put himself in rarified company.

"The feeling's out of this world," said Fitzpatrick, who carded a final-round 68 for a 6-under total of 274. "It is so cliche, but it's stuff you dream of as a kid. I can retire a happy man tomorrow.

"Any time you're sharing a record with Jack Nicklaus, it's unbelievable. So for me to have that as well is incredible. He called me up down there just at the presentation to congratulate me. Coming from someone like that, it means the world."

Fitzpatrick put on a ball-striking clinic on Sunday, hitting 17 of 18 greens. The only miss was on the 503-yard 10th, a hole the members play as a par 5 that was statistically the championship's toughest (4.39). Trailing Zalatoris by one, Fitzpatrick's fortunes changed at the par-4 13th when he converted a 49-footer for birdie.

When Fitzpatrick won the 2013 U.S. Amateur title at this venerable venue – one of the five founding clubs of the USGA – he closed out Oliver Goss of Australia on the 15th hole, and he essentially won the U.S. Open on the same hole, making a 19-foot birdie after reaching the green with a 220-yard 5-iron from a spot in the right rough where spectators had matted the turf down.

"It was one of the best shots I hit all day," he said. "To do that and take advantage of the break I had was fantastic."

Zalatoris, whose tee shot on No. 15 landed in thick rough, failed to get up and down from a greenside bunker. That gave Fitzpatrick a two-stroke cushion with three to play, and the cool customer from Sheffield closed with three consecutive pars. On the par-4 18th, a hole he bogeyed on Saturday, Fitzpatrick reached the putting surface from a left fairway bunker, a play some thought was risky.

Zalatoris had one final chance to force a two-hole aggregate playoff, but his 15-foot putt on the 18th green burned the left edge of the hole. It was his second consecutive runner-up finish in a major, having lost a three-hole aggregate playoff to Justin Thomas at last month's PGA Championship.


"Matt's shot on 18 is going to be shown probably for the rest of U.S. Open history," said Zalatoris. "I walked by it, and I thought that going for [the green] was going to be [gutsy], but the fact that he pulled it off and even had a birdie look was just incredible. So hats off to him. He played great all week."

Once the championship was secured, Fitzpatrick first celebrated with his caddie, Billy Foster, and then his parents and younger brother, Alex, who was his caddie here nine years ago. Alex just completed his eligibility at Wake Forest, where Zalatoris played on an Arnold Palmer Scholarship. Fitzpatrick also was embraced by TCC member Will Fulton, with whom he stayed nine years ago and again this week. Fulton was the club’s general chairman for the U.S. Open.

Good karma?

"I love playing this golf course," said Fitzpatrick. "It suits me so well. It suits my game well. I've been playing well for a while, and I think it all just fell into place that this was the place it was going to happen."

Thursday, June 16

2022 U.S. Open: Full Broadcast Schedule

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TELEVISION COVERAGE

A full programming schedule for the 122nd U.S. Open can be found here.

 

Date

Time (EDT)

Network

Coverage

Thursday, June 16

6:45–9:30 a.m.

Peacock

First Round

Thursday, June 16

9:30 a.m.–2 p.m.

USA

First Round

Thursday, June 16

2-5 p.m.

NBC

First Round

Thursday, June 16

5-7 p.m.

USA

First Round

Thursday, June 16

7-8 p.m.

Peacock

First Round

Friday, June 17

6:45–9:30 a.m.

Peacock

Second Round

Friday, June 17

9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

USA

Second Round

Friday, June 17

4-7 p.m.

NBC

Second Round

Friday, June 17

7-8 p.m.

Peacock

Second Round

Saturday, June 18

10 a.m.–noon

Peacock

Third Round

Saturday, June 18

Noon–8 p.m.

NBC

Third Round

Sunday, June 19

9-10 a.m.

Peacock

Final Round

Sunday, June 19

10 a.m.-noon

USA

Final Round

Sunday, June 19

Noon-7 p.m.

NBC

Final Round

Wednesday, June 15

2022 U.S. Open: An Inside Look at The Country Club (Video)



The following is based on notes provided by the USGA.

The Country Club, in Brookline, Mass., is one of the game's most historic venues, yet it has not hosted a U.S. Open in more than 30 years. In the above video, the USGA's Jeff Hall and The Country Club's Brendan Walsh are on site to inform fans about the historic layout that's hosting the world's best players this week.

THE COUNTRY CLUB HIGHLIGHTS
  • The 122nd U.S. Open will be the fourth conducted at The Country Club (1913, 1963, 1988)
  • The Country Club will host its 17th USGA championship, which will tie for second all-time
  • The 2022 U.S. Open will be the 59th USGA championship held in Massachusetts
  • In 2022, the U.S. Open Championship will be played in Massachusetts for the 10th time
  • The Country Club is one of the five founding members of the USGA, which was formed on Dec. 22, 1894

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE COUNTRY CLUB

The Country Club started as a six-hole layout but was extended to nine holes by Willie Campbell, a Scottish golfer who became the club’s head professional. The Country Club became one of the five founding members of the USGA in 1894, along with Newport (R.I.) Country Club, Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, in Southampton, N.Y., Chicago Golf Club and St. Andrew’s Golf Club, in Yonkers, N.Y. As golf caught on in the Boston area the course was expanded to 18 holes. The 27 holes in play today were constructed at different times with input from several architects. Francis Ouimet won the 1913 U.S. Open on the original course (Clyde & Squirrel), but the modern-day championship layout consists of fifteen holes of the original eighteen, with 3½ holes from the Primrose nine-hole loop that was designed by William Flynn. In 2009, Gil Hanse was asked to deliver a plan for the restoration of all 27 holes. The Country Club has hosted 16 USGA championships, including three U.S. Opens.
 
USGA CHAMPIONSHIPS AT THE COUNTRY CLUB

1902 U.S. Women’s Amateur: Genevieve Hecker def. Louisa A. Wells, 4 and 3

1910 U.S. Amateur: William C. Fownes Jr. def. Warren K. Wood, 4 and 3

1913 U.S. Open: Francis Ouimet def. Harry Vardon and Ted Ray, 304 (72) – 304 (77) – 304 (78)

1922 U.S. Amateur: Jess Sweetser def. Charles “Chick” Evans Jr., 3 and 2

1934 U.S. Amateur: W. Lawson Little Jr. def. David Goldman, 8 and 7

1941 U.S. Women’s Amateur: Elizabeth Hicks def. Helen Sigel, 5 and 3

1953 U.S. Girls’ Junior: Mildred Meyerson def. Holly Jean Roth, 4 and 2

1957 U.S. Amateur: Hillman Robbins Jr. def. Dr. Frank M. Taylor, 5 and 4

1963 U.S. Open: Julius Boros def. Jacky Cupit and Arnold Palmer, 293 (70) – 293 (73) – 293 (76)

1968 U.S. Junior Amateur: Eddie Pearce def. W.B. Harman Jr., 6 and 5

1982 U.S. Amateur: Jay Sigel def. David Tolley, 8 and 7

1988 U.S. Open: Curtis Strange def. Nick Faldo, 278 (71) – 278 (75)

1995 U.S. Women’s Amateur: Kelli Kuehne def. Anne-Marie Knight, 4 and 3

2013 U.S. Amateur: Matthew Fitzpatrick def. Oliver Goss, 4 and 3